Septic Inspection Scope

Scope A and B and C Below

Scope B (standard) will be performed for our customers unless another scope is requested in writing.

This describes the septic assessment process and lists the process involved, in an outline format, to best inform our buyers as to the process and value of the septic assessment. The State strongly suggests we uncover each system tank. This is not always possible and is limited by various factors: depth, location, budget and sometimes obstructions. 

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Scope A: Septic Inspection with Pumping.

(OPTIMAL)

  1. Obtain septic permit
    1. Most County Department of Environmental Health offices are not well managed and permit/layouts are not always available. This puts a limitation on the inspection process when the inspector is not able to determine the type of system in place, location, size, and parameters.
  2. Review septic permit
  3. Examine main waste line
  4. Examine building sewer
  5. Probe building sewer
  6. Probe tank
  7. Observe setbacks
  8. Uncover lid/s
  9. Pump Tank
  10. Inspect tank, inlet, outlet and processing or performance
  11. Probe for D box
  12. Probe leach field
  13. Stress system
  14. Dye test if standing or running water is observed
  15. Make assessment of potential unpermitted dumping of system
  16. Report findings

This assessment is an inspection of the septic system and a pumping of such. The pricing below is based on the inspector performing a home inspection in conjunction with such. If no building inspection is being performed fees may change and you will need to contact the inspector for such. The base septic inspection is $275.00 The inspection company will absorb fifty percent of the pumping fee up to $125.00 , when the pumping is ordered and an invoice for such will follow via email. The fee will be absorbed by reducing the inspection fee and the buyer will pay the septic pumping company directly.

Scope B: Septic Inspect – No Pumping

(STANDARD)

  1. Obtain the septic permit.
    1. Most County Department of Environmental Health offices are not well managed and permit/layouts are not always available. This puts a limitation on the inspection process when the inspector is not able to determine the type of system in place, location, size, and parameters.
  2. Review septic permit
  3. Examine main waste line
  4. Examine building sewer
  5. Probe building sewer
  6. Probe tank
  7. Tank lid accessible or digging performed during assessment
    1. Use tools to remove and replace lid
    2. $35 per lid (12-inch max)
    3. Lids not exposed when performing this inspection will revert to plan c or further assessment.
  8. Observe setbacks
  9. Probe for D box
  10. Probe leach field
  11. Stress system
  12. Dye test if standing or running water is observed
  13. Make assessment of potential unpermitted dumping of system
  14. Report findings

This assessment is an inspection of the septic system without a pumping; however, access of lid/s are performed for an inspection of the tank lids and visible interior components.  

Estimated Cost $275.00 to $345

Scope C: Septic Inspect – No Pumping No Excavation

(LIMITED)

Further Assessment May be Needed

  1. Obtain septic permit
    1. Most County Department of Environmental Health offices are not well managed and permit/layouts are not always available.
  2. Review septic permit
  3. Examine main waste line
  4. Examine building sewer
  5. Probe building sewer
  6. Probe tank
  7. Observe setbacks
  8. Probe for D box
  9. Probe leach field
  10. Stress system
  11. Dye test if standing or running water is observed
  12. Make assessment of potential unpermitted dumping of system
  13. Report findings

Estimated Cost $275.00

General:

Approximately every 3-5 years the system should be pumped and serviced. Systems are known to malfunction at different times during the year. The inspection assumes that perk tests, suitable soil elevations, setbacks, and compliance with permitting requirements have been met. If parties concerned have any reason to doubt this, it should be investigated.This is not an evaluation of the septic system. An evaluation implies future performance. This is an assessment to determine if an inspection/further evaluation is needed for real-estate transfer repairs. This report in no way warrants the future worth or performance of the system inspected. Only an excavation inspection will give a description of the system design, layout, condition, and materials. Only an inspection using a sonde locator or camera can definitively determine the location of the Septic Leach Field and is not included in this assessment.

Minimum distance requirements from well to the septic tank and or leach field and or system have not been measured nor considered by the inspector as part of the assessment or this report. A layout or design of the system must be attached to this report to overcome limitations associated with not having such. We will pull the permit from the county if it is available and review such. It is difficult to obtain these and they are not always available from the Department of Environmental Health. If the tank covers are not properly secured injury or death may occur. Always ensure that tank lids are properly secured.

If this report indicates that the system is not performing its intended function, defects were found and/or leaching was observed in the leach fields then some further evaluation and repairs are necessary. The inspector recommends that a qualified repair technician, make a second assessment to recommend needed repairs prior to the acquisition.

The inspector cannot comment on the future integrity of any systems, especially one that is tested in a vacant dwelling. This is a large limitation to the inspector’s ability to evaluate. Consider re-evaluated after six months of occupancy. If the number of occupants increases the system will be under additional stress and the test of time will determine the future integrity of such.

The inspector is licensed by the state of North Carolina. Presently there is no licensing in South Carolina; the North Carolina process is observed by Building Sciences 16:3 when performing assessments in SC; the differences in the installation and customs of South Carolina is also considered when doing South Carolina Inspections.

You are paying for our experience, knowledge, and expertise and to document deficiencies and limitations as well as potentially recommending further assessment when limitations are present. When we discover deficiencies or limitations in the system or lack of access or conditions that prevent further discovery such as, but not limited to, obstructions, a tank that is difficult to discover, or no record/permit/layout from DEH for review; we will proceed and document such, and include this in our report. You are securing our services to discover such, determine such and define potential limitations. At this point the inspection is complete and you may not have a definitive determination of all component conditions and will be directed to take further action.

Respectfully,

Mark R. Berardelli BCT

State Certification Home Inspector: 2764 active
State Certification Septic Inspector: 29461 active
State Certification Grade IV Septic Installer: 2946 active
IAQA Certified Mold Remediation: 03340 Inactive
ASHI member: 248318 Inactive
Insurance thru FREA E&O account: 34901 active
Degree in Building Construction Technology: Dickson City, PA
Mark R. Berardelli 27 Year Inspector (Since 1989